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charon

Posted 03 July 2015 - 12:07 AM

Sad news: Edward Burnham who played two different Professors in The Invasion and Robot has died at 98. http://www.doctorwho...-1916-2015.html

 
Just seen that on twitter but you have beat me to it. He was the second oldest actor living who had appeared in Doctor Who.

And kudos to Dean who mentioned him in the 'ideas' thread last year.

paulh85

Posted 02 July 2015 - 01:13 PM

the oldest being Olaf Pooley , still going strong at 101 !

 

another for the 2016 possibilities then!!


Posted 02 July 2015 - 12:48 PM

the oldest being Olaf Pooley , still going strong at 101 !


Bibliogryphon

Posted 02 July 2015 - 12:30 PM

Sad news: Edward Burnham who played two different Professors in The Invasion and Robot has died at 98. http://www.doctorwho...-1916-2015.html

 

Just seen that on twitter but you have beat me to it. He was the second oldest actor living who had appeared in Doctor Who.


YoungWillz

Posted 02 July 2015 - 12:26 PM

Sad news: Edward Burnham who played two different Professors in The Invasion and Robot has died at 98. http://www.doctorwho...-1916-2015.html


Davey Jones' Locker

Posted 05 June 2015 - 07:11 PM

 
Recently on ebay the original Liberator model was up for sale at £30,000. I was surprised at how big it was (small car size). I think the Heritage lottery fund should have purchased this for the Nation (it should be in a museum).

Hear, hear.

Bibliogryphon

Posted 05 June 2015 - 11:18 AM

To avoid excessive quoting I am not going to quote previous conversation but I am carrying on B7 topic.

 

Sarcophagus is part of an excellent trilogy of episodes which include Children of Auron & Rumours of Death.

 

Avon keeps his true feeling ambiguous but there is plenty there to play with.

 

Recently on ebay the original Liberator model was up for sale at £30,000. I was surprised at how big it was (small car size). I think the Heritage lottery fund should have purchased this for the Nation (it should be in a museum).


Davey Jones' Locker

Posted 04 June 2015 - 10:01 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the sad death of Tanith Lee I thought about how many writers for Blake's 7 were still alive.

 

Terry Nation wrote all of the first series himself but during series 2 other writers started contributing.

 

But it is not all plain sailing.

 

There are three writers who are definitely still alive

 

  • Chris Boucher
  • James Follett
  • Trevor Hoyle

 

but I cannot find any information about another three

 

  • Simon Masters
  • Ben Steed
  • Colin Davis

Can anyone help?

Didn't know Tanith had gone.  :(  She was my favourite B7 writer after Chris Boucher. 

 

When "Wife in Space" was blogging B7 last year, some of the site's readers tried to find out about Mr Steed and there isn't much information on him at all. In fact, the suggestion was raised that "Ben Steed" might even be a nom de plume for another writer, given the controversial nature of his scripts (the perceived sexism). 

 

 

Perceived?

 

They are atrocious.

 

"Give her to your men"

 

On his imdb page he has credits for a lot of other programmes such as CATS eyes, Crown Court, Dramarama & Coronation Street.

 

It is hard to tell if Kairos is a parody or serious.  Remember the rock "distorts and exaggerates things" so the hyper-masculine male character may be a parody.  If so, it was still badly written and ineffective.

 

Power is a bit ambiguous too since it says that a war betwen the sexes leads nowhere and all of the male tribe were portrayed as being fairly dopey so perhaps there is a bit more depth there in the script than most people realise.

 

 

Whatever his intentions, the overall execution of his scripts was terrible though.  :)

 

 

I would rank Moloch along with The Web and Dawn of the Gods as being the three worst episodes.

 

All of Allan Prior's episodes are fairly wretched, apart from Volcano.

 

I like Horizon but agree that Animals would only just be outside that bottom three.

 

Yes, Horizon's has a good premise and arguably more topic than ever in this day and age but it doesn't quite work for me.

 

BTW, I have recently purchased Paul Darrow's Lucifer trilogy.  I haven't read them yet but I have briefly skimmed through. They read very much like scripts so I suspect they have their genesis in the sequel trilogy/mini-series project that Darrow and Andrew Mark Sewell were trying to get off the ground some years ago as "Blake's 7 Enterprises."

 

According to the Paul Darrow Fan Club, only the initial premise (Avon being trapped on an island a la Napoleon on Elba) came from Terry Nation's idea for a sequel story. The rest of it came from chats between Darrow and Nation before that latter died but a sub-plot about China emerging as a global power was all Darrow's own idea.

 

As I said, I have only read a few extracts at this stage but parts of it are very florid.  Other parts are quite good but it is very much written by an actor with an eye for the dramatic.  There is also a lot of graphic violence in it but on one level that is good since Blake's 7 is basically about evil people doing evil things to even more evil people so emphasising the violence and ruthlessness of the characters even more than they could on the television show could emphasise the moral vacuum they all live in. After all, the only really "nice" and moral character in the series, Bran Foster, dies half way through the first episode...

 

BTW, even the title of the series, "Lucifer", is meant to highlight how morally bankrupt the characters in the B7 universe are.  Darrow himself has noted in interviews that we are meant to be left guessing who the Lucifer character is: is it Servalan? Is it Travis' daughter?  Is it the Chinese ruler? Is it Avon? They are all candidates for the title of fallen angel.

 

 

I did read Darrow's book Avon: A Terrible Aspect which was essentially Avon's back story. It was never published in the UK but I managed to get a US import it was comeptently written and ends as the series begins which left me wanting to see better adaptations of the series which could be fleshed out.

 

If you read Trevor Hoyle's adaptations who get glimpses of how the characters were developed by the actors particularly the first one which seems to have been writted from scripts rather than what was transmitted.

 

I always thought that the Avon/Cally relationship was  interesting she being almost his conscience and after her death he descends into his obsession with Blake which leads to the final confrontation.

 

Totally agree about the Avon/Cally stuff.  He leans on her after Anna's demise and when she too dies and he loses the Liberator, his final descent into madness begins....  BTW, that is one of the reasons I like the Tanith Lee episodes, since she explores relationships so well. I believe it was Sarcophagus that hinted much more at the affection Avon felt towards Cally.


themaninblack

Posted 04 June 2015 - 05:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the sad death of Tanith Lee I thought about how many writers for Blake's 7 were still alive.

 

Terry Nation wrote all of the first series himself but during series 2 other writers started contributing.

 

But it is not all plain sailing.

 

There are three writers who are definitely still alive

 

  • Chris Boucher
  • James Follett
  • Trevor Hoyle

 

but I cannot find any information about another three

 

  • Simon Masters
  • Ben Steed
  • Colin Davis

Can anyone help?

Didn't know Tanith had gone.  :(  She was my favourite B7 writer after Chris Boucher. 

 

When "Wife in Space" was blogging B7 last year, some of the site's readers tried to find out about Mr Steed and there isn't much information on him at all. In fact, the suggestion was raised that "Ben Steed" might even be a nom de plume for another writer, given the controversial nature of his scripts (the perceived sexism). 

 

 

Perceived?

 

They are atrocious.

 

"Give her to your men"

 

On his imdb page he has credits for a lot of other programmes such as CATS eyes, Crown Court, Dramarama & Coronation Street.

 

It is hard to tell if Kairos is a parody or serious.  Remember the rock "distorts and exaggerates things" so the hyper-masculine male character may be a parody.  If so, it was still badly written and ineffective.

 

Power is a bit ambiguous too since it says that a war betwen the sexes leads nowhere and all of the male tribe were portrayed as being fairly dopey so perhaps there is a bit more depth there in the script than most people realise.

 

 

Whatever his intentions, the overall execution of his scripts was terrible though.  :)

 

 

I would rank Moloch along with The Web and Dawn of the Gods as being the three worst episodes.

 

All of Allan Prior's episodes are fairly wretched, apart from Volcano.

 

I like Horizon but agree that Animals would only just be outside that bottom three.

 

Yes, Horizon's has a good premise and arguably more topic than ever in this day and age but it doesn't quite work for me.

 

BTW, I have recently purchased Paul Darrow's Lucifer trilogy.  I haven't read them yet but I have briefly skimmed through. They read very much like scripts so I suspect they have their genesis in the sequel trilogy/mini-series project that Darrow and Andrew Mark Sewell were trying to get off the ground some years ago as "Blake's 7 Enterprises."

 

According to the Paul Darrow Fan Club, only the initial premise (Avon being trapped on an island a la Napoleon on Elba) came from Terry Nation's idea for a sequel story. The rest of it came from chats between Darrow and Nation before that latter died but a sub-plot about China emerging as a global power was all Darrow's own idea.

 

As I said, I have only read a few extracts at this stage but parts of it are very florid.  Other parts are quite good but it is very much written by an actor with an eye for the dramatic.  There is also a lot of graphic violence in it but on one level that is good since Blake's 7 is basically about evil people doing evil things to even more evil people so emphasising the violence and ruthlessness of the characters even more than they could on the television show could emphasise the moral vacuum they all live in. After all, the only really "nice" and moral character in the series, Bran Foster, dies half way through the first episode...

 

BTW, even the title of the series, "Lucifer", is meant to highlight how morally bankrupt the characters in the B7 universe are.  Darrow himself has noted in interviews that we are meant to be left guessing who the Lucifer character is: is it Servalan? Is it Travis' daughter?  Is it the Chinese ruler? Is it Avon? They are all candidates for the title of fallen angel.

 

 

I did read Darrow's book Avon: A Terrible Aspect which was essentially Avon's back story. It was never published in the UK but I managed to get a US import it was comeptently written and ends as the series begins which left me wanting to see better adaptations of the series which could be fleshed out.

 

If you read Trevor Hoyle's adaptations who get glimpses of how the characters were developed by the actors particularly the first one which seems to have been writted from scripts rather than what was transmitted.

 

I always thought that the Avon/Cally relationship was  interesting she being almost his conscience and after her death he descends into his obsession with Blake which leads to the final confrontation.

 

 

Definitely a thing was going on between those two, I think one of the episodes from series 3 implies this...


Bibliogryphon

Posted 04 June 2015 - 11:20 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the sad death of Tanith Lee I thought about how many writers for Blake's 7 were still alive.

 

Terry Nation wrote all of the first series himself but during series 2 other writers started contributing.

 

But it is not all plain sailing.

 

There are three writers who are definitely still alive

 

  • Chris Boucher
  • James Follett
  • Trevor Hoyle

 

but I cannot find any information about another three

 

  • Simon Masters
  • Ben Steed
  • Colin Davis

Can anyone help?

Didn't know Tanith had gone.  :(  She was my favourite B7 writer after Chris Boucher. 

 

When "Wife in Space" was blogging B7 last year, some of the site's readers tried to find out about Mr Steed and there isn't much information on him at all. In fact, the suggestion was raised that "Ben Steed" might even be a nom de plume for another writer, given the controversial nature of his scripts (the perceived sexism). 

 

 

Perceived?

 

They are atrocious.

 

"Give her to your men"

 

On his imdb page he has credits for a lot of other programmes such as CATS eyes, Crown Court, Dramarama & Coronation Street.

 

It is hard to tell if Kairos is a parody or serious.  Remember the rock "distorts and exaggerates things" so the hyper-masculine male character may be a parody.  If so, it was still badly written and ineffective.

 

Power is a bit ambiguous too since it says that a war betwen the sexes leads nowhere and all of the male tribe were portrayed as being fairly dopey so perhaps there is a bit more depth there in the script than most people realise.

 

 

Whatever his intentions, the overall execution of his scripts was terrible though.  :)

 

 

I would rank Moloch along with The Web and Dawn of the Gods as being the three worst episodes.

 

All of Allan Prior's episodes are fairly wretched, apart from Volcano.

 

I like Horizon but agree that Animals would only just be outside that bottom three.

 

Yes, Horizon's has a good premise and arguably more topic than ever in this day and age but it doesn't quite work for me.

 

BTW, I have recently purchased Paul Darrow's Lucifer trilogy.  I haven't read them yet but I have briefly skimmed through. They read very much like scripts so I suspect they have their genesis in the sequel trilogy/mini-series project that Darrow and Andrew Mark Sewell were trying to get off the ground some years ago as "Blake's 7 Enterprises."

 

According to the Paul Darrow Fan Club, only the initial premise (Avon being trapped on an island a la Napoleon on Elba) came from Terry Nation's idea for a sequel story. The rest of it came from chats between Darrow and Nation before that latter died but a sub-plot about China emerging as a global power was all Darrow's own idea.

 

As I said, I have only read a few extracts at this stage but parts of it are very florid.  Other parts are quite good but it is very much written by an actor with an eye for the dramatic.  There is also a lot of graphic violence in it but on one level that is good since Blake's 7 is basically about evil people doing evil things to even more evil people so emphasising the violence and ruthlessness of the characters even more than they could on the television show could emphasise the moral vacuum they all live in. After all, the only really "nice" and moral character in the series, Bran Foster, dies half way through the first episode...

 

BTW, even the title of the series, "Lucifer", is meant to highlight how morally bankrupt the characters in the B7 universe are.  Darrow himself has noted in interviews that we are meant to be left guessing who the Lucifer character is: is it Servalan? Is it Travis' daughter?  Is it the Chinese ruler? Is it Avon? They are all candidates for the title of fallen angel.

 

 

I did read Darrow's book Avon: A Terrible Aspect which was essentially Avon's back story. It was never published in the UK but I managed to get a US import it was comeptently written and ends as the series begins which left me wanting to see better adaptations of the series which could be fleshed out.

 

If you read Trevor Hoyle's adaptations who get glimpses of how the characters were developed by the actors particularly the first one which seems to have been writted from scripts rather than what was transmitted.

 

I always thought that the Avon/Cally relationship was  interesting she being almost his conscience and after her death he descends into his obsession with Blake which leads to the final confrontation.


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