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Davey Jones' Locker

Posted Today, 03:00 AM

"She's dead, gin."


Posted Today, 02:47 AM

Another one to keep an eye on is Grace Lee Whitney who played Rand. She is 84 now, which is a miracle in itself, given that she hit the bottle badly back in her day. Old interview here: http://www.people.co...0106998,00.html

the bottle caught  up with her. dead at 85 http://www.nydailyne...ticle-1.2208990


YoungWillz

Posted Today, 01:23 AM

Grace Lee Whitney who played Janice Rand in the original Star Trek is dead at 85. http://www.yourcentr...fKUezOgKbksZ8_A

 

Here's a better one from NBC: http://www.nbcnews.c...ek-dies-n353001


Bibliogryphon

Posted 06 March 2015 - 12:20 PM

Not a good week for Star Trek as Harve Bennett dies


time

Posted 14 January 2015 - 01:28 AM

Not quite Star Trek but it turns out Robert Kinoshita, the bloke who designed Robbie the Robot for Forbidden Planet and B9 for Lost in Space, is still around at age 97:

http://en.wikipedia....obert_Kinoshita

Turns out there is a B9 Robot Builders' Club out there too: http://www.b9robotbu.../kinoshita.html

Robert Kinoshita died 9th December '14, aged 100.


Davey Jones' Locker

Posted 14 October 2014 - 10:57 PM

Another one to keep an eye on is Grace Lee Whitney who played Rand. She is 84 now, which is a miracle in itself, given that she hit the bottle badly back in her day. Old interview here: http://www.people.co...0106998,00.html

Bibliogryphon

Posted 14 October 2014 - 08:37 AM



I have never seen the animated show either and have no real desire to do so. One of the hardcore Trekkies atmy workplace though feels it is "canonical" and regards it as an extension of the original series.

Just to expand Bibliogryphon's commentthat TNG was buried uo its own rectum, I think one issue with it was that Voyage Home had been a huge popular hit in cinemas when I was a kid so, when a new Trek show was announced, casual fans thought it would have the same space/action/comedy/message formula but of course the show was very different. I don't think it was all that successful with mainstream audiences in Aus, because after a few years it was moved from Saturday evening to a late night slot. Obviously hugely popular amongst Trekkies though and I read somewhere it was quite popular in Germany.

Now, to put this discussion back on topic, who do we think will die first out of Nimoy and Shatner?


The logical choice would be Nimoy.

But he might deposit his katra somewhere and come back from the dead again! At least Shatner's Kirk has stayed dead (up until now, any rate.)


Just one other point on Trek in general: I have learned over the past few years that its popularity fluctuates dramatically from country to country. Here in Australia (and I think the UK would be similar) the early Trek films were considered, by most kids and causal viewers, to be more or less on a par with the Star Wars films. In other words, a Star Wars film would come out one year, then a Trek the next and so on, with Trek's popularity culminating with the aforementioned Voyage Home. After that, people lost interest and it has never really regained its appeal. Even the Abrams films were greeted with half-full cinemas here, despite the presence of Eric Bana in the first one.

In the US however, Trek apparently had a huge stigma due to the cult of Trekkies and a lot of JJ Abrams' effort in the recent films has been an attempt to make the series cool.

In the non-English speaking world, Trek has never been popular in many markets at all and is barely known, compared to the immense popularity of Star Wars. They did some surveys when the Abrams films came out and compared them with the recent X-Men and Wolverine films that were out at around the same time. Whereas X-Men and Wolverine had a nearly 50-50 split between domestic US and international box office earnings, Abrams' trek was something like a 70-30 split. Star Trek Into Darkness did better and started to gain traction in markets such as Mexico and parts of Asia but it has a long way to go until it is considered a mainstream franchise. In mainland Europe, it still has virtually no traction. (As mentioned above, one interesting market is Germany: because of TNG's success, more people went to see Insurrection and Nemesis at the box office than went to see either of the Abrams' films). Conclusion from all of this: the non-English speaking world has good taste.

Where I work may not be represntative of the rest of the UK but I know some hard core trekkies. Including someone high up in the official Patrick Stewart fan club.

Davey Jones' Locker

Posted 13 October 2014 - 09:54 PM


I have never seen the animated show either and have no real desire to do so. One of the hardcore Trekkies atmy workplace though feels it is "canonical" and regards it as an extension of the original series.

Just to expand Bibliogryphon's commentthat TNG was buried uo its own rectum, I think one issue with it was that Voyage Home had been a huge popular hit in cinemas when I was a kid so, when a new Trek show was announced, casual fans thought it would have the same space/action/comedy/message formula but of course the show was very different. I don't think it was all that successful with mainstream audiences in Aus, because after a few years it was moved from Saturday evening to a late night slot. Obviously hugely popular amongst Trekkies though and I read somewhere it was quite popular in Germany.

Now, to put this discussion back on topic, who do we think will die first out of Nimoy and Shatner?


The logical choice would be Nimoy.

But he might deposit his katra somewhere and come back from the dead again! At least Shatner's Kirk has stayed dead (up until now, any rate.)


Just one other point on Trek in general: I have learned over the past few years that its popularity fluctuates dramatically from country to country. Here in Australia (and I think the UK would be similar) the early Trek films were considered, by most kids and causal viewers, to be more or less on a par with the Star Wars films. In other words, a Star Wars film would come out one year, then a Trek the next and so on, with Trek's popularity culminating with the aforementioned Voyage Home. After that, people lost interest and it has never really regained its appeal. Even the Abrams films were greeted with half-full cinemas here, despite the presence of Eric Bana in the first one.

In the US however, Trek apparently had a huge stigma due to the cult of Trekkies and a lot of JJ Abrams' effort in the recent films has been an attempt to make the series cool.

In the non-English speaking world, Trek has never been popular in many markets at all and is barely known, compared to the immense popularity of Star Wars. They did some surveys when the Abrams films came out and compared them with the recent X-Men and Wolverine films that were out at around the same time. Whereas X-Men and Wolverine had a nearly 50-50 split between domestic US and international box office earnings, Abrams' trek was something like a 70-30 split. Star Trek Into Darkness did better and started to gain traction in markets such as Mexico and parts of Asia but it has a long way to go until it is considered a mainstream franchise. In mainland Europe, it still has virtually no traction. (As mentioned above, one interesting market is Germany: because of TNG's success, more people went to see Insurrection and Nemesis at the box office than went to see either of the Abrams' films). Conclusion from all of this: the non-English speaking world has good taste.

Bibliogryphon

Posted 13 October 2014 - 08:52 PM

I have never seen the animated show either and have no real desire to do so. One of the hardcore Trekkies atmy workplace though feels it is "canonical" and regards it as an extension of the original series.

Just to expand Bibliogryphon's commentthat TNG was buried uo its own rectum, I think one issue with it was that Voyage Home had been a huge popular hit in cinemas when I was a kid so, when a new Trek show was announced, casual fans thought it would have the same space/action/comedy/message formula but of course the show was very different. I don't think it was all that successful with mainstream audiences in Aus, because after a few years it was moved from Saturday evening to a late night slot. Obviously hugely popular amongst Trekkies though and I read somewhere it was quite popular in Germany.

Now, to put this discussion back on topic, who do we think will die first out of Nimoy and Shatner?


The logical choice would be Nimoy.

Davey Jones' Locker

Posted 13 October 2014 - 07:51 PM

I have never seen the animated show either and have no real desire to do so. One of the hardcore Trekkies atmy workplace though feels it is "canonical" and regards it as an extension of the original series.

Just to expand Bibliogryphon's commentthat TNG was buried uo its own rectum, I think one issue with it was that Voyage Home had been a huge popular hit in cinemas when I was a kid so, when a new Trek show was announced, casual fans thought it would have the same space/action/comedy/message formula but of course the show was very different. I don't think it was all that successful with mainstream audiences in Aus, because after a few years it was moved from Saturday evening to a late night slot. Obviously hugely popular amongst Trekkies though and I read somewhere it was quite popular in Germany.

Now, to put this discussion back on topic, who do we think will die first out of Nimoy and Shatner?

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